About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
CNNW 13
MSNBC 13
MSNBCW 13
CNN 10
CNBC 8
FBC 7
KGO (ABC) 5
KQED (PBS) 5
KPIX (CBS) 4
KRCB (PBS) 4
WMAR (ABC) 4
CSPAN 3
WETA 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 132
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 132 (some duplicates have been removed)
overseas and with hurricane katrina down in new orleans, and they say it does not look much different. walking around and having it be dead silent and hearing the hissing of natural gas coming out of the ground, we are still as of yesterday in search and rescue mode to be sure everyone is out of their house and safe before they allow people to come back. it is a very frustrating time. i can tell you what he was talking about on the earlier call, i had the opportunity last night to talk to some people in the shelters and they are amazed at the amount of people willing to help, total strangers. random citizens donating goods to try to help their fellow man. it is unfortunate it takes a tragic event like this to bring the best out of people. host: what is the best way the federal government can help your district? guest: first of all, the president has been doing everything he needed to do along with the governor in giving the governor of the tools that we need here in new jersey to get this process started. it is going to be a multi-year process to get us headed back in the right direct
experiences are chronicled in the book, the great delusion. >> well, we did have the 2005 hurricane katrina which devastated the gulf south america. we had 2000 people killed in that disaster. we have never had something like this, and actual disaster. what was learned from katrina is that george w. bush got a lot of phones down for doing a flyover and for not going into louisiana. for acting like he could look at it from a distance. all politicians have learned from his mistakes. uc barack obama cancelling his campaign, going to new jersey, and meeting with chris christie, a republican. most people in the u.s. he has done a good job. he was talking with the army corps as engineers. in that regard, it has helped, getting all the face time on the television when you don't see much of mitt romney. >> it has been striking, hasn't it, to see him with the governor and listening to the two of them congratulate and thank each other in this campaign we have seen such bitter politics. to see a democrat and republican coming together like this. >> that is supposed to be the best of america, when ther
airlines to talk about the impact on the industry and the man who led fema during hurricane katrina will tell us what the federal emergency agency should expect from this storm. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use, it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. you have to dig a little. fidelity's etf market tracker shows you the big picture on how different asset classes are performing, and it lets you go in for a closer look at areas within a class or sector that may be bucking a larger trend. i'm stephen hett of fidelity investments. the etf market tracker is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. get 200 free trades today and explore your next investing idea. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. >> we talked
and disasters i'm absolutely confronted by these two americas, the katrina/fema reaction and the sandy/fema reaction and the reality is to argue there hasn't been a significant political response to the significance of fema by different governments and it's not split down party lines. it's simply not true. there was a really great article in "mother jones" that took you through -- >> the development of fema competence. >> right. and who had headed fema and the way that presidents had appointed those fema heads were directly related to how they perceived their significance. so, for example, george bush actually allocated michael brown who was the former -- i just had to read this out, because i was just blown away. michael brown who was the former commissioner of judges and stewards for the international arabian horse association, that's who headed fema. clinton was the first -- was the first president to allocate the fema head who actually had experience -- >> disaster. >> -- disaster management. it's not political. it's about poverty. it's about race. and when we think about disaster
was not sufficient with all the traumas from katrina and manmade traumas, we have not thought about what we need to do to protect ourselves from these natural and unnatural attacks. hopefully this is what this wake-up call will do for us. >> well certainly they won't be leaving major equipment in basements. major mris were down underwater. they were pumping it out and it's all saltwater, which is very destructive. it will be millions of dollars. >> eliot: and saltwater is enormously destructive. that's part of what caused the con ed transformers to blow up. i'm worried about what it will take to rebuild this infrastructure. that makes the case. cost will be vast. >> you can see the gridlock that we're experiencing. if you try to move through manhattan it takes you hours. it shows how dependent we really are on the subway system. we have to get it up and running. our hospitals functioning again. it's a huge challenge. i've never seen the federal state and city government work more more hormonously. and the president just said, i'm telling everyone to get back to them in 15 minutes. i can get ever
up in flames and four other houses. >> we think back about katrina and what a big impact that was on our country, we rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm, we think of the aftermath. right now we're in the aftermath period in terms of sandy. tell me how you feel about that. and before we get to rebuilding, people taking care of continuing damage right now, how do you assess the coordination between the state, federal, and local municipalities? >> i think we're doing very well. i think the president's response has been terrific, really. it's been coordinated unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard governor christie, who is a republican with president obama working together, and that's how it's been from the president, to the governor, to the counties and the towns. one of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i t
. it is not katrina but we are a close second. >>shepard: any time your house is without power or full of water or on the ground you have your own private katrina. a lot of the people staying at your hotel which is not normal, they are from there. >>guest: yes, we own two hotel s in the same parking lot here so we have been here for ten years and we have opened up at the world trade center so we are used to disaster. no one realized how bad this is and on wednesday when we thought the people who are here if a couple of days would leave, we thought it would get better and it was not getting better, we called the marathon people and said we would not send our neighbors into the street and we are going to need to tell the marathon people they is to go someplace else. >>shepard: you are not the only one calling the marathon people. this is a cover of the "new york post" owned by the parent company saying abuse of power, with generators that will power tenths for the marathon folks. listen to what happened on fox business network, where we share resources. here is what happened: charlie gasparino sa
they have a lot in common with the people of the gulf coast who suffered through katrina in 2005. the sheer size and scope of the destruction from hurricane sandy stretches for hundreds of miles, from the jersey shore, to long island. this was a big storm, and has brought a significant part of the country to its knees. >> look at this line! it goes back -- this line goes six miles. look at this! >> reporter: with power still out to millions of people, one of the biggest daily concerns has become gasoline. some lines at stations that still have gas stretched for blocks. tempers of the drivers in those lines frayed. and police have even been called in to patrol the lines to keep the peace. >> i need to run my taxi too. >> reporter: there were some signs of meaningful progress. in new york city, more train and subway service was added. all told, the electricity is back on for more than 4 million homes and businesses across the northeast. >> oh, my god! >> reporter: this evening, the lights came back on in new york's greenwich village, something worth celebrating. and all but two of atlantic ci
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
, some are now drawing comparisons between this superstorm and katrina. so just how do they measure up? cnn meteorologist severe weather expert chad myers is taking a closer look. he's joining us now. how do they measure up, chad? >> well, first of all, the storm surge with katrina was enormous. almost three times more of a wave or of a surge with katrina as bay st. louis was about 28 feet. manhattan island, downtown, the battery, had about 9.5 feet. haven't seen too many numbers higher than that. 9.5 feet moving into the city comparing to moving into the bay, obviously there's a town there and all the way do biloxi, it's the population density in new york city that is going to -- and in new jersey and connecticut, that is going to put this way up in the record books. katrina, $145 billion in damage. andrew, this is cost for adjusted inflation $43.5 billion. and looks like somewhere sandy will fall somewhere between katrina and into andrew. so probably number two on the scale for dollar damage. now, when it comes to deaths, it's disturbing, wolf, to see and hear how quickly the fatalit
all of this living through this for a second time is proof of how katrina changed the nation's psychology when it comes to storms. >> yes. >> how many lessons have been learned, dark days along the gulf coast in '05. see it playing out. closest thing to katrina since '05. you are seeing the country changed after the storm, even response on every level has changed as well. interesting to watch, yet again for sure. >> yeah. >> coming up next, images are almost too much for adults to comprehend. for children, the pictures from sandy could be downright heartbreaking and confusing. >> we'll show you what one familiar fuzzy face is doing to help them understand. ♪ we have all been assaulted by the sights and sound of hurricane sandy. they can be hard for an adult but overwhelming for a child. >> imagine what it is like for kids. gma anchor josh elliott has this story. >> reporter: we adults called it a super storm. amidst the ferocity of nature's wrath, it was just plain scary. how do you talk to kids about getting through the storm of the century. we got together with a panel of
oceanic and not mr. association, the costliest storms to hit katrina by one at funk shot. take, about 30 billion. andrew in 90 to about 36.5 billion. wilma in 2005, i've been 18 billion, charlie indo for 15 billion, reader, frances and jeanne all and hurricane damage. in your view, does the national flood insurance program currently structured work? >> i think it does work. it does help protect consumers from an uninsurable event in the private arcade. the program was created in 1968 was the result created because the private market could not accurately and in suitably underrate the insurance risk. so what was happening was people were completely without flood insurance protection. so is happening in the 60s and 50s as american citizens were being flooded and the only recourse that she had was federal disaster assistance after the fact. so the program was created to have people pay into a program and be prepared for storm and a flood event before it happened. now, it certainly could use improvement. you know, there are critics out there whose fate is is too subsidized by the federal gove
their lives. >> you remember this back with katrina, the same thing happened where a lot of residents in new orleans had seen a lot of hurricanes before. and they heard this is going to be the storm of century, and nothing ever happened to their houses, and they ignored evacuation orders. you can't -- there's only so much preparation you can do. you can never create a risk-free society. you can't prepare for everything. you know, but one of the things that has to happen in these situations for things to work right is for the government has a part to play, but individuals have a part to play, too. you've got to be working together so when people -- some of these people, obviously, their pain is genuine and totally understandable. but some of these people did, you know, were told to leave and didn't leave. and you understand why they didn't. it makes sense in human terms, but, you know, there is a responsibility that you have for yourself in addition to what the government obviously has for you. and again, if both sides are woaren't working together, that's when things fall apart. >> the perso
here. the same group that went to the gulf coast following hurricane katrina. the navy is bringing in pumps that they normally use on ships. i want it draw attention to the building behind me. it is staten island ferry entrance. currently all services are suspended indefinitely. the police tape is up by the battery park underpass. because as you can see 50 feet of water is still there. limited subway service began before 6:00 today. mta says 5.5 million people daily right on their subways. they also say any day that their trains are not running it costs them $18 million in revenue. traffic has been a mess throughout the city because of lack of people not being able to use public transportation and road closures. they're making three occupants or more are in each vehicle if they're going over the four east river bridges. they won't get a ticket but they won't let people through if they don't have three people in there. also the area around where the crane collapsed in midtown is still frozen. we heard from the mayor bloomberg and he is saying that that is going to be weekend before
government has stepped in to help. this is the third hurricane i've covered in my lifetime, andrew, katrina and now this. we are at the point where the population gets furious and they turn on the government. the government can just not handle the huge, huge logistical requirements that happen after a storm like this. could this actually turn on the president at some point here? >> reporter: i don't think so. i think what the president has had the opportunity to do is show americans that he was involved in an effort that the country was rallying behind and do his job in a way that got praise by the keynote speaker at the republican convention, chris christie, very tough critic of the president otherwise. so i don't think many voters are going to blame president obama for what's going on right now, and leave aside the fact that the states in which the difficulties are occurring db new york, new jersey, connecticut are all reliantly democratic states. what is much more important to the outcome of this election, michelle, is what's going on behind me at this afl-cio phone bank where union volu
from the corps of engineers a special team that pumps and they worked in katrina. they are onsite. we are showing them the situation and they are assessing it. we want to pump out the water to see what is going on in the tunnels and that will help us get the power back. >>reporter: the most difficult question, timetable, your best projection when new york city will return to the new york city we all remember. >>guest: is the new york city you remember. it is the new york city you remember today. because it is made up of new yorkers. >>reporter: with working subways. >>guest: well, the new york subway system...the buses have started running this evening limited and will run full service tomorrow. subways will come back in the in few days but the subways don't make new york, new york. >>reporter: i should add, some good news we are told that when the buses are up and running today and tomorrow, they are going to be free. >>shepard: a lot of questions about the power grid in lower manhattan and whether they can supply power to the stock exchange. he clearly cannot hear me. another point
what is going on. and the first thing we noticed was how much it felt like katrina. but it was much different in casualties with katrina, but then looking in the windows, and seeing men, women and children waving at us. most of them were smiling. the reason most of them are smiling is because the water has gone down a bit. the feeling is that it will continue to go down and they will be perhaps to start walking out of their houses tomorrow. it's not guaranteed yet. we saw scores of people waving at us, waiting to get out of their homes. we saw people trying to leave on their own. they seemed confused. a few people were driving through the water and so the cars got stuck and they could not push them. a police officer got out and went to rescue the people. took the woman on his shoulder and brought her to the shovel we were sitting in and the mayor and i helped to pull the woman in and the two other people in, that's the situation. it's incredible. right now, there are people in the dark and cold, waiting to be able to come out of their homes safely. >> it's amazing as you tell it. ga
that katrina because they spent it on massage parlors and everything you can think of in addition to what was necessary. >> jennifer: that's iowa tea party congressman and crazytown resident steve king. he's one of 11 congressional members who days after hurricane katrina voted against $51.8 billion in relief spending in louisiana and mississippi. and now, just days after hurricane sandy he obviously has not changed his tune. and it is that kind of radical radical/insane thinking that's gotten him into his tightest re-election race yet. the latest ppp poll has him running three points ahead of his democratic opponent, christie vilsack. 48% to 45% in iowa. congressman king is not alone. several of his fellow representatives from tea party crazytown are in the political fights of their lives as well. begin with minnesota congresswoman michele bachmann. she's off the charts in name recognition. she raised $18 million more than her democratic opponent jim graves. her district has an 8% republican registration edge but still sh
call that had to be made in new orleans after katrina with mardi gras. >> huge debate. the difference was -- the storm in august. mardi gras was in february. months between. now days between. >> i know. >> i don't know. i don't know. a tough call here. it is going to go on. the mayor said it is. those of you coming into the city to do it. run hard. run well. we'll be back with more after this. >> announcer: this is abc's "world news now." informing insomniacs for two decades. >>> this morning on "world news now," a presidential promise of help in the heart of the hurricane devastation. >> president obama and new jersey governor chris christie stood side by side as they toured the destruction and talks with the victims of sandy. it's thursday, november 1st. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good thursday morning, i'm sunny hostin. paula faris is on assignment. >> always good to have you as the co-pilot here. >> so good to be here. >> there's power here and there's heat which is good. >> yes. both of which i do not have at home. >> soldiering through. welcome b
. do you think they would have run the new orleans marathon the week of katrina? >> right. i don't think so. >> steve: of course not. >> gretchen: rest of the headlines for saturday. president obama ordering the military to send extra gallons of fuel to new york and in the wake of seand. gas shortages unless people panicked. gas will be rationed starting at noon people with license plates ending in odd number will only be able to buy gas. cars with license plates ending in even number can fill up on even numbered days. four ohio men busted for stealing mitt romney campaign signs. some were found in a union truck. police found tools that could be used to take signs down. local campaign workers have had problems with signs being stolen. this the is first time someone has been caught. the men were arrested and face misdemeanor charges. people in parts ofism know are going to have to pony up extra money if they want to buy a gun now. cook county, which includes chicago, has approved a tax that charges people 2 a dollars for every gun that they buy. well, the move is expected to raise
sense as well? >> katrina? yes. i know how those people in katrina feel. i really do. my heart went out to them. but until you go through something like this, you cannot understand the magnitude of this. my friends have come to help me. they said, michelle, we looked at your yard because we have all the stuff in the yard. they said, michelle, if we didn't see this with our own eyes, we would never believe it. >> and it's hard to know when power will be restored. mayor bloomberg said the ferry service will resume in the next day or so. he says full service by saturday, the ferry from staten island over to manhattan, new york. but who knows what's going to happen. >> i don't know. >> our heart goes out to you and your family. >> thank you so much. i'm a big fan of yours, wolf. it's a pleasure to speak with you. you know, i have to put it in perspective. we have our lives and i have my children. and, you know, it's just stuff like my kids say. but when i find my son's baby book, it rips at your heart strings. but i'm grateful that we're here. >> yeah. and i like your attitude. you got to t
. this was not an evacuation zone. >> i can relate to your guest there, after hurricane katrina, what that is like to search for relatives. it takes days and days to figure out where folks are and sort it out. if this is search and rescue effort are we assuming people that they are trying to get to and find are okay, that they are alive, not injured, they are in fairly decent condition? >> yeah. the last we talked to executives here, from the county, no fatalities. they felt confident about that. of course until they get in there themselves and see we're not going to have final word. we're keeping fingers crossed. we do have a little bit of cell phone, it's spotty. there is no power. we were speaking to another woman before who said they had jet skis, that they stored for the winter, her husband took it out. he was ferrying people around to dry land, coming back here. people coming in reporting who is left, neighbors that need help. that is helping. daylight's important. as you know, officials here scrambling to do house-to-house searches while they have light because there's no power in the area. >> thank
katrina and 9/11. this is actually a company that charles has talked about before. take a look at how the dollar is faring today. ♪ from local communities to local businesses. the potential of yelp unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. to a currency market for everyone. the potential of fxcm unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. >> 22 minutes past the hour. i am jamie colby with your fox news minute. some subways are rolling again. none of them are going into lower manhattan which is still without power. long lines to get a shuttle bus into the city. they carry more than 5 million people a day. the commuter railroads are providing service. in the meantime, all fares are waived through midnight tomorrow night. all three new york airports are back in service. even on a limited basis. laguardia was the last to come back online due to flooding. everyone should confirm flights before heading to the airport. president obama and mitt romney are back on the campaign trail. after three days focusing on the federal response to the storm, the president w
, there is debris everywhere but there isn't just devastation. this is an katrina that watch everything away. these buildings still exist. there is a heck of a clean up here to do but this can come back. a little worse down the beach in seaside heights and atlantic city but it will come back but look. look at this debris. junk everywhere. this is going to take a while. this is the roof of the tiki bar which is 300 yards up the beach. this was the roof of it and that is deposited here. i leave you with this shot at the atlantic ocean. it occurred to me today that as i look out there it is almost like nothing happened. the ocean is saying i was upset but i am calm now. i may not stay calm forever but you are good for while. connell: that pictures of beautiful and to come back to the isolation is jarring. what stood out to you today? today is the first day you had a chance to walk around the. >> exactly. the first sunny day. the first real nice day. you hit it exactly right. the contrast in the devastation and the beauty. this is typically what we see after hurricane. took a couple extra days b
just a few moments ago that this is similar to what we saw during katrina. >> that's right. hard to grasp. >> homes on fire. >> and then you've got homes on fire. you saw it in new orleans with katrina. these just spontaneous explosions involving homes. and unfortunately, you've got all this water, and firefighters and first responders can't get that water -- >> yeah. to use it to put -- >> to put on the fire. it's a dangerous situation for them. and this is exactly what the mayor was trying to warn people about. don't put your first responders in danger. but this is the situation here. we're going to have much more of our continuing coverage of this superstorm. next. cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? 100% new. 100% mmm... wow, that is mmm... it's so mmm you might not believe it's a hundred calori
following a critical disaster. he got the port of new orleans up and running after hurricane katrina in 2005. gary lagrange joins us now from new orleans. welcome to the program. it is good to see you here. if the port of new york were to make a call to you and say, look, gary, you've done this before, what should we do? what would you say to them? >> well, first, i think the port of new york, new jersey is in great hands. admiral rick larabie has weathered the storm many times before. the communications aspect is first and foremost about anything. the pilots, noaa, coast guard, army corp of engineers, all staying in touch with each other to ensure that the port and the harbor can open just as quickly as possible to assure that the safeguard and movement of commerce is first safe, but also expeditious as well. because of the magnitude of a port like new york, new jersey, just is an absolute must. a huge market area. many consumers relying on it. >> more broadly, ceos who are obviously attempting to hold businesses together and ensure that they function, many of them in a very, very difficult
with katrina, if the federal response is sluggish or looks unprepared for this, that's a worse damage to the president than anything else, and i think that the president has to do this. he's canceled four events in four states over the next two days. right now he's scheduled to go to green bay at the end of the tuesday. we'll see if that happens. probably unlikely. he may start again on wednesday when he's supposed in ohio. >> although to his benefit you could argue in some of the key states, places like new york and new jersey and connecticut, they're very strong governors there who are experienced with this stuff and unlikely to fumble the response. we'll see how that goes. let's bring in congresswoman marcia blackburn, a republican from tennessee. what impact do you think this storm will have to the presidential race? >> i'm not certain that it's going to have any direct impact. i will say that our thoughts and prayers are definitely with everyone and with the elected officials that are dealing with this response, with the emergency responders. i think that one of the things that p
how much money geico has made since the katrina year, how much buffett has made? a fortune. what was that, 2005? >> yeah. >> but i do wonder if you did have trading this morning, what somebody look travelers or berkshire would be trading at. >> but weaved had less hurricanes since 2005 than you would think. >> refinery, do you know anything about the plants around here? >> i don't know the specific plans, but i know that's certainly a risk. about 7% of the nation's refining is done here in new jersey and dwell wear. and they're right in the path. absolutely right in the path. so i would expect to see those guys shut in if they haven't already. which will impact obviously gas prices. >> there was speculation how you could see oil prices drop because no one will be taking supply. >> that's true. absolutely. >> paul, thank you very much. you'll be in-house with us. >> i'm weathering the storm here. >> andrew, i'm not kidding, last week, a sociologist writing for the huffington "post" said if this doesn't get us to completely try to get off all fossil fuels as quickly as we possibly
's katrina. just devastating impacts here. this historic surge, 13 feet, all that water coming on in and the high wind gusts. worst-case scenario did pan out here unfortunately. >> all right. mark mann cue sew from accuweather. the airlines trying to get back to normalcy and what the red cau cross is doing to help out. >> plus more incredible rescues that didn't have to happen. we'll be right back. en. we'll be right back. >> announcer: "america this morning" brought to you by 5 hour energy. 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. so i can get the energized feeling i need and support a great cause? i'm sold. pink lemonade 5-hour energy? yeah and a portion of every sale goes to the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. i'm sold. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy. get the alert, energized feeling you need and support breast cancer research and access to care. but what about your wrinkles? neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair visibly reduces fine lines and wrinkles in just one week. why wait if you don't have to. neutrogena®. [ male annou
and the current pushed it the entire way. >> so many of these scenes reminiscent of katrina. what weird images coming from the storm. absolutely unbelievable. >>> when we come back this morning, the stock exchanges will be up and running today. that's a bit of good news. but what about tens of thousands of new york city marathon runners? the race set for sunday. >> that's the million-dollar question. >>> and a bird's-eye view of the terrible impact of sandy, right here in the big apple. with over 200 varieties, keurig makes brewing a delicious cup of coffee simple. how does it brew such great coffee? well... inside the brewer are these green fields of coffee, and if you travel up this mountain, there's this huge coffee grinder. and then the coffee lands in this cup and water rushes through. actually, i just press this button. brew what you love, simply. keurig. living with moderate to semeans living with pain.is it could also mean living with joint damage. help relieve the pain and stop the damage with humira, adalimumab. for many adults with moderate to severe ra, humira is clinically proven
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 132 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)